Tag Archives: Funding

Come and work with me: Data Scientist (KTP Associate)

Fancy working with me on a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) project in collaboration with Yard Associates, funded by Innovate UK with support from the Welsh Government?

A Data Scientist/KTP Associate position is available to develop an adaptable web analytics framework for predicting future purchasing behaviours and recommended marketing strategies based on attributed visitor history and interaction data, using hybrid machine learning and big social data analytics. Emerging research — and the development of practical toolchains — leveraging machine learning, social network analysis, natural language processing, sentiment analysis, data science and big data analytics are making a significant impact on a wide range of sectors. However, there exists a significant translational research problem: in applying and developing these emerging research advances into intelligent, adaptable and usable toolchains for a wide range of markets. This project thus aims to new products and services in the web analytics space for Yard, based upon novel and hybrid machine learning/big data analytical approaches.

This is a two year project, with a pro-rata salary of £21,000 (as well as a generous budget for professional development, including an opportunity to complete a funded MPhil at Cardiff Met). For informal enquiries, please drop me an email: tcrick@cardiffmet.ac.uk; further information and how to apply can be found on the Cardiff Met website.

Deadline for applications: Wednesday 15 June.

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Come and work with me: KTP Associate in Big Social Data Analytics

Fancy working with me on a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) project in collaboration with Coup Media (funded by Innovate UK with support from the Welsh Government)?

A KTP Associate position is available to develop an adaptable social media analytics engine and associated framework for the film and media industry to capture consumer insight, marketing perceptions, sentiments, trends and rankings using big social media datasets. With the explosion of social networking, there is a clear correlation between box office takings and sentiments, opinions and perceptions expressed in the public domain on social media platforms. This project aims to leverage this by developing an extensible and adaptable social media sentiment engine using big social datasets (initially targeting Twitter) to rank movies by opinion, informing industry marketing decisions and providing commercially valuable insight into the public’s emerging movie tastes and selections.

This is an 11 month position, with a pro-rata salary of £21,000. For informal enquiries, please drop me an email: tcrick@cardiffmet.ac.uk; further information and how to apply can be found on jobs.ac.uk and the Cardiff Met website.

Deadline for applications: Friday 19 June.

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Come and do a funded PhD with me

Fancy doing a PhD with me at Cardiff Metropolitan University? I have a fully-funded studentship (for UK/EU students) starting in January, in collaboration with HP in Bristol:

The Department of Computing & Information Systems, Cardiff Metropolitan University, is pleased to offer a fully funded PhD Studentship in Provably Optimal Code Generation.

This research project (Scaling Superoptimisation for Enterprise Applications) is part of an on-going strategic collaboration between Cardiff Metropolitan University and Hewlett-Packard in Bristol; HP is a leading technology company that operates in more than 170 countries around the world, providing infrastructure and business offerings that span from handheld devices to some of the world’s most powerful supercomputers.

Applicants must have an excellent first degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Mathematics or a related discipline, with interests/experience at the hardware/software interface and/or in mathematical foundations.

This three year PhD will commence in January 2015. The PhD bursary consists of the standard tuition fee for a Home/EU student (to be £3,760 in 2014/15) and a stipend linked to the minimum amount set annually by Research Councils UK (currently £13,590 p.a.).

Project Context:

Our world is increasingly dependent on the effectiveness and performance of software. Tools and methodologies for creating useful software artefacts have been around for many years, but the scalability of these systems for solving challenging real world problems are — in many important cases — poor. While there are numerous socio-technical issues associated with developing large software systems, there is a significant opportunity to address the optimisation of software in a strategic, adaptable and platform-independent way.

Superoptimisation is an approach to optimising code by aiming for optimality from the outset, rather than as the aggregation of heuristics that are neither intended nor guaranteed to give provable optimality. Building on previous work by Crick et al., this research project will further develop the theoretical foundations of superoptimisation, as well as developing a scalable toolchain for superoptimising enterprise-level software applications.

 
For informal enquiries, please send me an email: tcrick@cardiffmet.ac.uk (but please apply via FindAPhD or here).

Deadline for applications: Friday 31 October.

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Come and do a (fully-funded) PhD with me

Fancy doing a PhD with me at Cardiff Metropolitan University? I have a fully-funded studentship (for UK/EU students) starting in September, in collaboration with HP in Bristol:

Scaling Superoptimisation for Enterprise Applications

Our world is increasingly dependent on the effectiveness and performance of software. Tools and methodologies for creating useful software artefacts have been around for many years, but the scalability of these systems for solving challenging real world problems are — in many important cases — poor. While there are numerous socio-technical issues associated with developing large software systems, there is a significant opportunity to address the optimisation of software in a strategic, adaptable and platform-independent way.

Superoptimisation is an approach to optimising code by aiming for optimality from the outset, rather than as the aggregation of heuristics that are neither intended nor guaranteed to give provable optimality. Building on previous work by Crick et al., this research project will further develop the theoretical foundations of superoptimisation, as well as developing a scalable toolchain for superoptimising enterprise-level industrial software applications. This research project is a collaboration between Cardiff Metropolitan University and Hewlett-Packard (HP) in Bristol; HP is a leading technology company that operates in more than 170 countries around the world, providing infrastructure and business offerings that span from handheld devices to some of the world’s most powerful supercomputers.

Applicants must have an excellent first degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electronics or a related discipline, with interests/experience in compilers, optimisation, logic programming, satisfiability modulo theories and mathematical foundations.

 
For informal enquiries, send me an email: tcrick@cardiffmet.ac.uk (but please apply via FindAPhD or here).

Deadline for applications: Friday 22 August.

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The personal cost of applying for research grants

For many academics, this article is a no-brainer. Research grant proposals take huge amounts of time to put together, with low success rates (e.g. EPSRC). It’s a huge cost:

The pressure to win high-status funding means that researchers go to extraordinary lengths to prepare their proposals, often sacrificing family time and personal relationships. During our research into the stressful process of applying for research grants, one researcher, typical of many, said, “My family hates my profession. Not just my partner and children, but my parents and siblings. The insecurity despite the crushing hours is a soul-destroying combination that is not sustainable.”

 

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The Economic Significance of the UK Science Base

A new independent report for the Campaign for Science & Engineering (CaSE) published today shows that investing public money in science and engineering is good for the economy. The Economic Significance of the UK Science Base examines the economic impact of public investment in the UK science base.

uksciencebasecover

The report looks in detail at the relationship between public funding of science and engineering and three levels of economic activity: total factor productivity growth in industries; ability of universities to attract external income; and interaction between individual researchers and the wider economy.

The report shows that, at the level of industries, universities and individual researchers, public investment in science and engineering leads to economic growth. CaSE is thus calling for current and future governments to recognise that public spending on science and engineering is an investment with significant benefits for the economy and society.

The report was written by Professor Jonathan Haskel (Imperial College Business School), Professor Alan Hughes and Dr Elif Bascavusoglu-Moreau (both University of Cambridge). It was funded by a consortium of six CaSE members: British Pharmacological Society, The Geological Society, The Institution of Engineering and Technology, Institute of Physics, Royal Society of Chemistry and Society of Biology.

Read the full report or the key messages from the two page briefing note.

(N.B. I sit on the board of directors of CaSE)

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Grant applications, early 20th century style

warburggrant

Facsimile of a research proposal submitted by Otto Warburg to the Notgemeinschaft der Deutschen Wissenschaft (Emergency Association of German Science), c.1921.

The application, which consisted of a single sentence, “I require 10,000 marks“, was funded in full.

(read the full Nature Reviews Cancer article)

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EPSRC Fellowships announced

Last week, the EPSRC announced the 43 successful researchers who have been awarded fellowships totalling £36M to “help develop their potential as the next generation of world-leading scientists and engineers.

After a recent reorganisation of their fellowship programmes, the EPSRC now provide a number of personal fellowships to early career and well-established researchers to carry out ambitious programmes of research, usually over a five-year period. These fellowships fund the recipient and enable them to build a research team around a specific topic area; they are prestigious and highly coveted by those within the EPSRC‘s remit.

However, as discussed on the Dundee Physics blog, the EPSRC‘s press release appeared to focus more on the funding infrastructure and process (perhaps indirectly supporting Shaping Capability), rather than highlighting the excellence of the researchers (who, seemingly as an afterthought, were named at the end of the press release). This is in stark contrast to the recent announcement of the Royal Society’s 2011 University Research Fellowships.

All of the following information has been taken from Grants on the Web (with thanks to David McGloin for first collating it):

Career Acceleration Fellowships

EPSRC Ref. PI Organisation Title Value (£)
EP/J002062/1 Ross, Dr J University of Cambridge Links between Algebraic Geometry and Complex Analysis 693,701
EP/J002658/1 Dembele, Dr L University of Warwick Explicit methods for algebraic automorphic forms 589,359
EP/J001317/1 Jeffrey, Dr M University of Bath When Worlds Collide: the asymptotics of interacting systems 349,723
EP/J001686/1 Majumdar, Dr A University of Oxford The Mathematics of Liquid Crystals – Analysis, Computation and Applications 501,887
EP/J00149X/1 Haynes, Dr A University of Bristol Circle rotations and their generalisations in Diophantine approximation 590,969
EP/J002437/1 House, Dr TA University of Warwick Disease transmission and control in complex, structured populations 632,534
EP/J001872/1 O’Hara, Dr C University of Strathclyde Chiral Concepts in s-Block Metal Amide Chemistry 907,993
EP/J002194/1 Hofferberth, Dr S University of Nottingham Few-Photon Nonlinear Optics in Ultracold Rydberg Gases 1,142,329
EP/J002208/1 Kerridge, Dr A University College London Theoretical studies of actinide complexation with macrocyclic ligands: identifying synthetic targets and real-world applications 594,433
EP/J002615/1 McLain, Dr S University of Oxford Structural studies of atomic interactions in membranes: bridging the gap between physics and membrane biology 1,345,845
EP/J001821/1 Leek, Dr PJ University of Oxford Strong coupling and coherence in hybrid solid state quantum systems 892,726
EP/J002275/1 Hayward, Dr T J University of Sheffield MAGNETISM YOU CAN RELY ON: Understanding Stochastic Behaviour in Nanomagnetic Devices. 698,105
EP/J002542/1 Galan, Dr M University of Bristol Novel ionic-based tools for glycoscience 920,060
EP/J002550/1 Kar, Dr S Queen’s University of Belfast Next generation laser-driven neutron sources for ultrafast studies 617,279
EP/J002518/1 Graham, Dr DM The University of Manchester Terahertz electron paramagnetic resonance: A window on biological exploitation of quantum mechanics 755,989
EP/J002577/1 Eden, Dr SP Open University Electron attachment to biomolecular clusters: probing the role of multiple scattering in radio-sensitivity. 618,329
EP/J002348/1 Zair, Dr A Imperial College London CADAM: Capturing Attosecond Dynamics in Atoms and Molecules 697,864
EP/J001538/1 Bull, Dr JA Imperial College London Novel strategies to access chiral heterocycles as potential lead compounds in drug discovery 723,115
EP/J002305/1 Barnes, Dr P R F Imperial College London Charge Carrier Dynamics and Molecular Wiring in Hybrid Optoelectronic Devices 722,816
EP/J002534/1 Greaves, Dr S J University of Bristol Dynamics of Gas-Liquid Reactions; The Pseudo-Surface Approach 1,059,463
EP/J002259/1 Hubert, Dr C Newcastle University DEEPBIOENGINEERING 985,943
EP/J002186/1 NGODUY, Dr D University of Leeds Advanced traffic flow theory and control for heterogeneous intelligent traffic networks 480,598
EP/J002380/1 Eames, Dr M University of Exeter The development of an early stage thermal model to protect against uncertainty and morbidity in buildings under predicted climate change 506,058
EP/J002356/1 Dean, Dr P University of Leeds Coherent detection and manipulation of terahertz quantum cascade lasers 695,589
EP/J002224/1 Brotherston, Dr J Queen Mary, University of London Logical Foundations of Resource 465,503
EP/J002607/1 Sadrzadeh, Dr M University of Oxford Foundational Structures for Compositional Meaning 529,968
EP/J002526/1 Yamagishi, Dr J University of Edinburgh Deep architectures for statistical speech synthesis 741,163
EP/J001953/1 Mather, Dr M University of Nottingham Self-assembling Liposome Nano-transducers 733,385
EP/J002402/1 Ebbens, Dr S University of Sheffield Using Self-Assembling Swimming Devices to Control Motion at the Nanoscale 896,741
EP/J002100/1 Reddyhoff, Dr T Imperial College London Triboemission and Boundary Film Formation 719,805

Leadership Fellowships

EPSRC Ref. PI Organisation Title Value (£)
EP/J003948/1 Gelfreykh, Dr V University of Warwick Unstable Dynamics in Hamiltonian Systems 821,038
EP/J004022/1 Luczak, Professor MJ University of Sheffield Stochastic models for epidemics in large populations: limiting and long-term behaviour 952,949
EP/J003840/1 Adjiman, Dr CS Imperial College London The molecular frontier: extending the boundaries of process design 1,278,003
EP/J004081/1 Reynolds, Dr P University of Sheffield Advanced Technologies for Mitigation of Human-Induced Vibration 1,056,999
EP/J003867/1 Alavi, Professor A University of Cambridge Quantum Monte Carlo meets Quantum Chemistry 968,120
EP/J003875/1 Bongs, Professor K University of Birmingham Dipolar Quantum Magnets 1,325,121
EP/J003832/1 McKenna, Professor P University of Strathclyde Multi-PetaWatt Laser-Plasma Interactions: A New Frontier in Physics 1,330,510
EP/J003859/1 Bresme, Dr F Imperial College London Novel thermo-molecular effects at nanoscale interfaces: from nanoparticles to molecular motors 1,181,480
EP/J003999/1 Gregoryanz, Dr E University of Edinburgh Synthesis and Studies of Novel States of Matter at Extreme Conditions 1,103,039
EP/J004049/1 Colton, Dr S Imperial College London Computational Creativity Theory 970,170
EP/J004057/1 Cohen, Professor N University of Leeds WHole Animal Modelling (WHAM): Toward the integrated understanding of sensory motor control in C. elegans 1,185,968
EP/J004111/1 Krasnogor, Professor N University of Nottingham Towards a Universal Biological-Cell Operating System (AUdACiOuS) 1,026,408
EP/J003964/1 Rosser, Dr SJ University of Glasgow A synthetic biology approach to optimisation of microbial fuel cell electricity production 960,594
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How to forecast average tuition fees

With the BBC today surmising that at least two-thirds of universities in England want to charge £9,000 a year for some or all courses, the recent media frenzy has clearly not considered the skewed distribution of universities that have actually announced their fees levels.

As William Cullerne Bown’s excellent Exquisite Life blog post highlights, lots of universities in the Russell Group have declared at £9,000, whereas lots of universities in the harder-pressed Million+ have not.

Drawing an average for the entire sector by relying on a simple arithmetical average of the fees declared is inherently flawed and only suitable for eye-catching newspaper headlines. I recommend reading the rest of his post; it’s reassuring to see data points plotted on a graph and some actual analysis with regards to where the average will eventually sit.

But this raises the question of whether an average tuition fee value is even a worthwhile metric to consider, unless you normalise for a number of different variables, for example an institution’s size. Furthermore, from my perspective, this is all rather moot, as the future of tuition fees for higher education in Wales is somewhat more complicated.

UPDATE 2011-04-20: Confirmed today by the Office for Fair Access, (via the Times Higher) that for the 2011-2012 academic year, 139 institutions (consisting of 122 higher education institutions and 17 further education institutions) had submitted draft access agreements by the deadline.

Surely this has blown away the idea that £6k would be the norm and charging up to £9k would only be in “exceptional circumstances”.

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